Don't let social anxiety keep you from living life to the fullest. See if Joyable's online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy program can help. Take our quiz
Don't let social anxiety keep you from living your life to the fullest. See if Joyable can help. Take our quiz

The Beginner’s Guide to Social Anxiety Treatments

Have you been thinking about getting help for social anxiety but don’t know where to start? Choosing a treatment plan is a big step and can feel overwhelming. This guide will give you an overview of 6 common social anxiety treatments and help you compare the differences between them to determine which treatment is best for you.

contents-ch1

contents-ch2

contents-ch3

inperson therapy social anxiety

contents-ch5

contents-ch6

contents-ch7

Overview of social anxiety treatments

Research has shown that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the number one treatment for social anxiety. A meta-analysis of over 100 studies concluded that CBT “should be regarded as the best intervention for the initial treatment of social anxiety disorder [1].” Also, CBT is recommended by leading mental health organizations like the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) [2] and the U.K. National Health Service (NHS)[3].

Nowadays, CBT is not only delivered in the therapist’s office, but also through apps, online programs, and books. Studies have shown that CBT can be effective in all these formats, so when you’re choosing a plan, it’s helpful to consider personal preferences like cost, convenience, and how much accountability you need. For example, if you’re super self-driven, a CBT self-help book offers a lot of flexibility. But, if you tend to procrastinate, a self-help book may not offer the accountability you need. It’s like training for a marathon; you might be self-motivated enough to stick to weeks of a training plan, or you might need a personal trainer or running group to stay motivated.

Treatment comparison chart

To help you decide, here’s a chart summarizing the different treatment options for social anxiety. We’ll devote a chapter in this guide to each of these approaches:


Sources:

[1] http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpsy/article/PIIS2215-0366(14)70329-3/abstract
[2] https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/anxiety-disorders/index.shtml#part_145383
[3] http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-anxiety/Pages/Social-anxiety.aspx

arrows-ch2
 
 
 

Share This Post
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

More Posts

Comments (1)

Comments are closed.

It’s Guaranteed

We want to help you, and your success is our success. If at any time you’re not satisfied, we’ll give you your money back. No questions asked.

Start my 7-day free trial